Archive for the ‘Stellenbosch’ category

The Stellenbosch Winelands

October 18, 2011

Stellenbosch is synonymous with the oldest Wine Route in the country, which draws wine-lovers and tourists from around the world.

The Stellenbosch Wine Route now comprises of more than 110 cellars, of whom most are open to the public, and where some of the finest, award-winning wines can be sampled. Wines of the region are of a very high standard and regularly win International awards.

Although the farms have been handed down through generations, recently some foreign investment has seen the area infiltrated by some oversees buyers. As a result a healthy cross pollination has taking place.

Read more… exploresouthafrica.net

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Alto- Helderberg Hike and Rib braai

September 15, 2011

Alto’s pairing sensations at this year’s Stellenbosch Wine Festival

June 22, 2011

Popular Alto Estate offers visitors a delicious combination of its reds, teamed up with melt-in- the-mouth home-made pâtés. Each of the three wines in the range will be combined with a pâté and be served with artisanal 100% rye bread made in the area. Guests are encouraged to end off this experience with Alto Port served with cranberry and dark chocolate biscotti.

The Stellenbosch Wine Festival has become a Cape Winelands institution during the winter months and is a popular attraction for both local and international wine enthusiasts. The exciting activities offered by Neethlingshof, Uitkyk, Alto and Le Bonheur are not to be missed!

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Stellenbosch Wine Route

June 15, 2011

The Stellenbosch Wine Route is arguably the country´s most famous, and the Stellenbosch Wine of Origin area includes 106 cellars – most of which are open to the public. Here you can enjoy a long day´s wine tasting, and wine buying.

The heart of the town lies somewhere near the oak-lined Dorp Street. With its venerable old buildings, Stellenbosch is the University´s main thoroughfare, where modern student life sits comfortably side by side with the history and architectural heritage of Stellenbosch.

An important cultural centre, Stellenbosch has many galleries and museums housing important national and international art collections.

Read more… www.wineroute.co.za

Alto perfectly paired with pâtés

April 14, 2011

Known for its impressive collection of classically-styled reds, Stellenbosch estate Alto is now offering visitors a delicious combination of its reds, teamed up with home-made pâtés.

Each of the three wines in the range is combined with a pâté of the day. These are served on artisanal 100% rye bread made in the area, all just for R50.

Against the backdrop of dramatic mountain views, visitors can also enjoy red wine sundowners, served with freshly baked white bread, dukkah, pesto and extra virgin olive oil also priced at R50.

The tasting room is open 09h00 – 17h00, Monday – Fridays and 10h00 – 16h00, Saturday, Sunday and public holidays.

Source: wine.co.za

Cooking with wine – Tips and guidelines

March 30, 2011

 

There are certain guidelines when cooking with wine and it is important to know what effect the wine can have on the dish.

In order to cook with wine you need to know what wine is made of and what will be the effect on certain dishes when wine is used in the cooking process.

Wine is made up of water, grape acids, tannins and alcohol. All of these players, individually and together, affect the final result. Alcohol itself is tasteless, but it affects the release of flavour and fragrance molecules from the other components. It helps fats to dissolve and penetrate the food, bringing out hidden flavours. This is a chemical reaction that “ordinary” liquids, like water or stock, or even fats such as butter or oil cannot achieve. For this reason, when wine is added to the pot it should be allowed to simmer, uncovered, so that the alcohol and some of the volume evaporate. Never add wine at the end of cooking.

When red wine is made, the seeds and the skins are in prolonged contact with the grape juice, so red wine is rich in tannins. White wine is low in tannins because the juice does not come into contact with the skin and seeds during fermentation. Thick-skinned grapes (such as cabernet sauvignon) will result in tannin-rich wine, in contrast to thin-skinned varieties (like merlot).

White wine is low in tannins because the juice does not come into contact with the skin and seeds during fermentation. Thick-skinned grapes (such as cabernet sauvignon) will result in tannin-rich wine, in contrast to thin-skinned varieties (like merlot).

During marination the tannins and other acids in the wine penetrate the meat’s fibers and bind to its proteins, leaving the meat much softer and tastier than it was before its wine bath. Adding tannin-rich wine while cooking will improve the flavours of a meat dish beyond recognition, softening and rounding out hidden fragrances. In cooking, the tannins bind to the meat proteins and coax out their best flavours. When the food is eaten only the aroma remains; the tannins do not react adversely with the proteins in saliva to spoil the enjoyment.

But beware – adding red wine to a vegetable dish does exactly the opposite. The tannins will remain, making the dish relatively astringent. For that reason it’s best to use white wine or a low-tannin red wine when cooking vegetarian foods.

Source: haaretz.com